The Production and Use of Audio-Visual Narratives in Ethics Education: An Experience from Turkey


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Işil Ülman F. Y. , Vatansever K., Kavas M. V.

5th Cambridge Consortium for Bioethics Education, Paris, Fransa, 24 - 26 Haziran 2015

  • Basıldığı Şehir: Paris
  • Basıldığı Ülke: Fransa

Özet

5th  Cambridge Consortium for Bioethics Education

Paris, 24-26 June 2015, Oral Presentation Abstract

 

The Production and Use of Audio-Visual Narratives in Ethics Education:

An Experience from Turkey

 

Mustafa Volkan Kavas[1], Kevser Vatansever[2] , Yesim Isil Ulman[3]

 

The use of cinematographic narratives as an educational material in medical education dates fairly back to produce a certain material based on theoretical and practical content. It has been soon realized that the audio-visual narratives could be so helpful for clinical and biomedical ethics teaching.  Film sequences and excerpts from films are frequently and functionally utilized, in medical, nursing schools and similar professional institutions, to keep the students attention alive during learning process, to exemplify the ethical behaviour and attitude of characters, to stabilize the effects and probable outcomes of macro and micro determinants on person’s actions and choices, and more importantly, to analyse the function of theoretical knowledge over practice by means of convincing human experiences. This educational technique is argued to be distinctly more influential than the conventional methods of teaching to raise awareness and to make the students reflect on the ethical values.

 

Some schools of medicine in Turkey benefit from the existing audiovisual narrative materials in education, while some of them prefer to use original audiovisual materials that are produced to cover certain learning domains of their undergraduate medical curricula. For instance, as integrated into the medical education, a documentary film called “Scent of Illness” (Hastalık Kokusu) produced by an amateur collective seeking to discover “the meaning of being a chronical patient” is used in ethics education by Ankara University School of Medicine as well as in Ege University School of Medicine (Izmir) and Acibadem University School of Medicine (Istanbul). Similarly, “the Dust”, a short documentary film on the story of victimization of sandblasting denim workers is used in accordance with the curriculum of medical ethics and humanities in Acibadem University School of Medicine. A personal approach to death and experiences about the interactions with health professionals, told as a self-narrative by a fatally cancer diagnosed patient is used in “delivering bad news” small group teaching in Ege University School of Medicine.

 



[1] Ankara University, School of Medicine, History of Medicine and Ethics, Assist. Prof. Dr, kavas@ankara.edu.tr

[2] Ege University, School of Medicine, History of Medicine and Ethics, Assist. Prof. Dr. Izmir

[3] Acibadem University, School of Medicine, History of Medicine and Ethics, Prof. Dr. Istanbul,