The relationship between responsiveness to social and monetary rewards and ADHD symptoms


Sutcubasi B. , Metin B., Tas C., Krzan F. K. , Sari B. A. , Ozcimen B., ...More

COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE, vol.18, no.5, pp.857-868, 2018 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 18 Issue: 5
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Doi Number: 10.3758/s13415-018-0609-1
  • Title of Journal : COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
  • Page Numbers: pp.857-868
  • Keywords: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Event-related potentials, FRN, P2, P3, Reward processing, ATTENTION-DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER, MEDIAL FRONTAL-CORTEX, TURKISH VERSION, FEEDBACK NEGATIVITY, NEURAL RESPONSES, IMPULSIVITY, PREDICTION, ANTICIPATION, ADOLESCENTS, IMPAIRMENTS

Abstract

Alterations in reward processing are frequently reported in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). One important factor affecting reward processing is the quality of reward as social and monetary rewards are processed by different neural networks. However, the effect of reward type on reward processing in ADHD has not been extensively studied. Hence, in the current study, an exploratory research was conducted to investigate the effect of reward type (i.e., social or monetary) on different phases of reward processing. We recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) during a spatial attention paradigm in which cues heralded availability and type of the upcoming reward and feedbacks informed about the reward earned. Thirty-nine (19 males) healthy individuals (age range: 19-27 years) participated in the study. ADHD symptoms were assessed by using ADHD self-report scale (ASRS). Our results revealed a consistent negative correlation between the hyperactivity subscale of ASRS and almost all social-feedback related ERPs (P2, P3, and FRN). ERP amplitudes after social feedbacks were less positive for P2 and P3 and more negative for FRN for individuals with greater hyperactivity levels. Our findings suggest that hyporesponsiveness to social feedbacks may be associated with hyperactivity. However, the results have to be confirmed with clinical populations.