Reproducibility of the head-up tilt test results in children with vasovagal syncope


Alehan D., Uner A., Ayabakan C. , Ozer S., Ozme S.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY, vol.88, no.1, pp.19-25, 2003 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 88 Issue: 1
  • Publication Date: 2003
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/s0167-5273(02)00379-0
  • Title of Journal : INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY
  • Page Numbers: pp.19-25
  • Keywords: syncope, tilt, children, PASSIVE UPRIGHT TILT, UNEXPLAINED SYNCOPE, TABLE TEST, IMMEDIATE REPRODUCIBILITY, NEUROCARDIOGENIC SYNCOPE, ISOPROTERENOL, SPECIFICITY, ADOLESCENTS, INTERVAL

Abstract

Background: This prospective study aims to investigate the reproducibility of HUTT results in children with typical history of vasovagal syncope. Methods: Between October 1996 and October 1999, 58 children with a history of typical vasovagal syncope attacks were evaluated with head up tilt test (HUTT). The table was tilted to 60degrees and the patients were monitored for heart rate and blood pressure changes during 45 min. No provocative agents were used. The test was repeated a week later at a similar setting. Results: Of 58 patients, 39 had positive and 19 had negative response during the initial test. During the second test, the positive response was reproduced in 29 cases (50%), and the negative response was reproduced in 16 cases (28%). Ten patients (17%) with an initial positive test had a negative second test. A negative test became positive only in three patients (5%). There were 12 vasodepressor, four cardioinhibitor and 23 mixed responses among the initial tests. Only in four patients did the type of the response change from vasodepressor to a mixed type during the second test. The reproducibility of a positive tilt test was 74.4% (29/39), the negative tilt test was 84.2% (16/19), and the overall reproducibility of the HUTT was 77.6% (45/58). Conclusions: Unprovoked HUTT in children is reproducible when repeated on different days and similar settings and the results are comparable to the ones with adult patients. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.