An in vitro 3D diabetic human skin model from diabetic primary cells.


Yilmaz O., Kenar H. , Davun K., Yucel D. , Doger E., Alagoz S.

Biomedical materials (Bristol, England), vol.16, pp.15027, 2020 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 16
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Doi Number: 10.1088/1748-605x/abc1b1
  • Title of Journal : Biomedical materials (Bristol, England)
  • Page Numbers: pp.15027
  • Keywords: in vitro 3D skin model, type 2 diabetes, GelMA, hydrogel, photocrosslinking, MESENCHYMAL STEM-CELLS, PHOTOCROSSLINKABLE GELATIN, MECHANICAL-PROPERTIES, ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS, BONE REGENERATION, VASCULAR NETWORK, HYDROGEL, COLLAGEN, METHACRYLATE, ACID

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus, a complex metabolic disorder, leads to many health complications like kidney failure, diabetic heart disease, stroke, and foot ulcers. Treatment approaches of diabetes and identification of the mechanisms underlying diabetic complications of the skin have gained importance due to continued rapid increase in the diabetes incidence. A thick and pre-vascularized in vitro 3D type 2 diabetic human skin model (DHSM) was developed in this study. The methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogel was produced by photocrosslinking and its pore size (54.85 +/- 8.58 mu m), compressive modulus (4.53 +/- 0.67 kPa) and swelling ratio (17.5 +/- 2.2%) were found to be suitable for skin tissue engineering. 8% GelMA hydrogel effectively supported the viability, spreading and proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts. By isolating dermal fibroblasts, human umbilical vein endothelial cells and keratinocytes from type 2 diabetic patients, an in vitro 3D type 2 DHSM, 12 mm in width and 1.86 mm thick, was constructed. The skin model consisted of a continuous basal epidermal layer and a dermal layer with blood capillary-like structures, ideal for evaluating the effects of anti-diabetic drugs and wound healing materials and factors. The functionality of the DHSM was showed by applying a therapeutic hydrogel into its central wound; especially fibroblast migration to the wound site was evident in 9 d. We have demonstrated that DHSM is a biologically relevant model with sensitivity and predictability in evaluating the diabetic wound healing potential of a therapeutic material.